Mon-Fri 8:00am - 5:00pm EST 856-667-7727

Agenda

Three Days to Discover, Connect and Participate

With an array of prominent expert tech transfer speakers and an agenda that covers topics ranging from federal lab commercialization success stories to licensing and litigation strategy, the FLC national meeting offers lively training courses, informative sessions and an annual Industry Day designed to appeal to a diverse business and technology R&D audience.
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  • April 24 - Training Day


  • April 25 - Meeting Sessions


  • April 26 - Industry Day


  • Plenary
    Training
    Where
    Millennium Hall

  • New technology transfer professionals T2 newbies, start here! This course is designed to teach the basic tech transfer concepts you need to know. Through case studies, exercises, and a whole lot of discussion with our expert trainers, you’ll learn: • What technology transfer really means • Tech transfer’s purpose and what it can do • An overview of what it takes to actually put it into place • The major tech transfer mechanisms.
    Training
    Where
    Congress A - 4th Floor

  • This class is for technology transfer professionals who have a basic foundation in the background, concepts, and processes of technology transfer, have completed the “Technology Transfer for Beginners” course or our other intermediate-level courses or those who want to understand intellectual property protection at federal laboratories. (Not designed to be legal training for attorneys) This course examines the patent process and other forms of intellectual property (IP) protection in the context of federal technology transfer. It will provide detailed information on how to protect intellectual property in federal laboratories, with a focus on the patent process; summarize ownership rights to IP developed under government contracts; explain the major laws affecting IP in federal labs; and explain the types of rights collaborators typically want and how to work with them within the law. The course will cover: Intellectual property basics Types of IP protection as they relate to technology transfer Laws governing the IP system Rights in government inventions Practical tips for navigating IP processes and issues as a T2 practitioner.
    Training
    Where
    Commonwealth A - Second Floor

  • Who it’s for: New or mid-level technology transfer professionals who need to learn how to craft and negotiate Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs) Individuals who need a refresher on the finer points of CRADAs People with a basic understanding of technology transfer and its purpose CRADAs are one of tech transfer’s most important mechanisms, so understanding them is crucial for most federal T2 professionals. This course is our one-stop shop for everything CRADAs! With seasoned experts and a bevy of examples, you’ll learn all about the CRADA and how it works. We’ll cover: CRADA authority and laws What CRADAs are and why they work CRADA practices and pitfalls Intellectual property considerations.
    Training
    Where
    Commonwealth D - 2nd Floor

  • Who it’s for: Individuals with at least a basic understanding of technology transfer and patents Anyone who needs to understand the licensing process at federal labs T2 professionals who want to develop their negotiation skills (Not designed to be legal training for attorneys) Through real-world advice and hands-on practice, this interactive workshop examines the elements of an effective license and provides an overview of how to successfully negotiate a license agreement—whether you’re dealing with a government-owned and government-operated (GOGO) or government-owned and contractor-operated (GOCO) lab. The course will cover: Intellectual property valuation Types of licenses and when to use them Financial considerations and analysis Key provisions and effective terms of a license Steps, tips, and strategies for negotiation GOGO and GOCO processes and differences.
    Training
    Where
    Commonwealth B - 2nd Floor

  • Who it’s for: Experienced T2 professionals who want to take their marketing efforts to the next level. Marketing your lab technologies and your office can be fun, rewarding, and high impact when you follow the right roadmap. And best of all, it can be done without a lot of money. Join us as we dispel the myths about marketing and share essential marketing advice. You will be introduced to a step-by-step roadmap for building effective marketing programs, and leave the session with a hands-on toolkit full of concrete tools and techniques you and your staff can use to build winning marketing programs. This workshop will offer value to those new to marketing as well as those with experience. Here’s a sampling of the topics we’ll discuss: Marketing Programs vs. a Marketing Plan – Driving Your Big Buses Taking Stock of Your Current Marketing Tools – Disclosure Forms, Two-Pagers, etc. Looking Through the Eyes of Your Customers – Lab Scientists & Engineers, CRADA Partners, Management, Employees – One size does not fit all The Marketing Foundation – Audience-Message-Positioning Building a Message Board – Committing to “Your 3 Words” Telling Your Story Digitally – Websites, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, etc. Telling Your Story Tangibly – Associations, Events, Seminars, Content Marketing Marketing Up – Gaining Management Buy-in Execution – Your Back-of-the-Envelope Metrics.
    Training
    Where
    Congress C - 4th Floor

  • Learn to identify and understand your external innovation ecosystem! In this advanced class, the goal is to help you engage and leverage the activities and resources outside the lab for increased technology transfer that benefits both your lab and the economy. You’ll learn how to: Understand T2 in the context of the innovation ecosystem (IE) and technology-based economic development (TBED). Understand and validate what your lab values (or could) from IE/TBE. Identify and assess the IE/TBED in your area to develop a strategy for engagement and partnership. Identify and engage the players and resources of the IE/TBED ecosystem.
    Training
    Where
    Commonwealth C - 4th Floor

  • In today’s complex and ever-changing T2 environment, the ability to strategically connect with and inform others within the lab has become increasingly critical. This workshop will show you how to converse with your stakeholders in ways that get results. You will gain insight into your personal communication style and understand how to adapt it for diverse audiences, including senior management and laboratory researchers. You’ll learn about and apply tools and strategies that strengthen your credibility, enable you to better understand the needs of others, build stronger relationships, and hone your ability to communicate the value that T2 brings to all levels of the organization. **There is an additional $100 registration fee for the AMA training course. Seating is limited to 25 people. Admission is on a first-come, first-served basis.
    Training
    Where
    Congress B - 4th Floor

  • Plenary
    Where
    Commonwealth Hall B-D

  • Featured as this year's keynote speaker, Dan Berglund, President and CEO of SSTI, will lead attendees in an exploration of recent trends, challenges, and the abundance of collaborative opportunities that are available to federal laboratories in and around their surrounding communities. With over 20 years of experience leading SSTI, Berglund has kept his finger on the pulse of state and regional technology-based economic development activity, both domestically and abroad. He will share insights into how state and regional encouragement of growth through science, technology and innovation has brought about an unprecedented transformation in response to a variety of technological, political and economic forces. According to Berglund, the fluidity of this innovative environment presents tremendous opportunity for federal labs to begin to design and engage in new partnerships and strategic alliances, and to collaborate with a broad range of state, local and nonprofit players.
    Plenary
    Where
    Commonwealth Hall B-D

  • Government agencies vary vastly from size to budget, as do their technology transfer (T2) programs. Some agencies have diverse research portfolios that require unique approaches to transfer technologies to external partners and stakeholders. This session will feature agencies that have leveraged unique T2 programs to make their internal stakeholders (R&D and leadership) feel valued and encouraged to collaborate with external partners. This session will share lessons learned that have resulted in viable T2 programs for small agencies with limited budgets.
    Session
    Where
    Commonwealth Hall A

  • For technology transfer offices, licensing and negotiation are crucial steps in the T2 process, where both the lab and industry partners involved work to ensure their goals are met and a technology can reach the applicable marketplace. Speakers from Argonne National Laboratory and Brian Lally of the DOE's intellectual property (IP) counsel will discuss lessons learned in a patent enforcement action by a national laboratory with a licensee.
    Session
    Where
    Commonwealth Hall B-D

  • The success of technology transfer programs is built on companies advancing innovations to the marketplace. The National Science Foundation (NSF) I-Corps program prepares scientists and engineers to extend their focus beyond the university laboratory, and accelerates the economic and societal benefits of NSF-funded, basic research projects that are ready to move toward commercialization. In addition to the program at NSF, some agencies have launched their own programs to specifically address the needs of their lab community and create an entrepreneurial culture within their agency. This panel will provide an overview of the I-Corps program and some well-developed agency programs to provide this needed skill to potential entrepreneurs, as well as the scientists and engineers who will interface with the business community.
    Session
    Where
    Commonwealth Hall B-D

  • RTI International and NIST entered into a cooperative agreement in 2016 to improve the measurement and communication of technology transfer outputs and impacts from federal laboratories. The 2018 FLC national meeting will be the first time that RTI presents preliminary analyses from this project. RTI conducted 10 diverse case studies of technology transfer across 10 participating agencies. In this synthesis of case studies, factors related to success, challenges, and preliminary findings will be outlined. Each case study investigates the outputs/outcomes/impacts of technology development and transfer from federal laboratories, transfer mechanisms, and the context in which these occurred. Cases demonstrate the wide variation in "technologies," transfer partners, and beneficiaries of federal laboratory research, and the importance of contextual factors for making benefits to the public a reality. RTI will also provide initial exploration of the administrative data on CRADAs, patents, and licenses that have been shared by participating agencies.
    Session
    Where
    Commonwealth Hall A

  • This panel showcases 2018 FLC award winners in the Excellence in T2 and Interagency Partnership award categories. Panelists will share their stories and explore how their technologies were successfully integrated outside of the federal sector. Award-winning stories include: "MODD - Mixed Odor Delivery Device" (Excellence in T2 Award) U.S. Naval Research Laboratory "Rate Activated Tethers (RATs)" (Excellence in T2 Award) U.S. Army Research Laboratory "Zika Virus Specimen and Material Sharing" (Interagency Partnership Award) NIAID, CDC, NIH, U.S. DHHS
    Session
    Where
    Commonwealth Hall B-D

  • FLC Business is a next-generation search tool that provides researchers, entrepreneurs, and laboratory professionals with laboratory resource data from the entire federal laboratory system on one easy-to-use platform. During this session, FLC Program Director Marc Snyderman will explore the facets of this unique search engine, as well as review the other innovative tools and services that the organization provides in promoting, educating and facilitating technology transfer.
    Session
    Where
    Commonwealth Hall A

  • Dr. Perconti will provide an overview of the ARL and its broad technology portfolio. He will also offer details on the status of the ARL Open Campus initiative that was launched in 2014 to improve cooperation between ARL, academic institutions, small businesses, and industry. Open Campus lays the foundation for a global science and technology (S&T) ecosystem, enabling long-term national security. Open Campus is based on three major tenets: 1) modern government workforce and management; 2) shared facilities between government, academia, and the private sector; and 3) a collaborative culture that fosters an entrepreneurial and innovative environment.
    Session
    Where
    Commonwealth B-D

  • Awards

  • Professional photo opportunity for group and individual Award winners.
    Awards
    Where
    Banquet Room

  • Reception is cash bar. Dinner will be served at 5:45pm. The Awards Reception/Dinner/Ceremony is a business formal occasion. Thank you for dressing in business formal attire.
    Awards
    Where
    Millennium Hall

  • Dinner will be served prior to the Awards Ceremony. The Awards Reception/Dinner/Ceremony is a business formal occasion. Thank you for dressing in business formal attire.
    Awards
    Where
    Millennium Hall

  • Plenary
    Where
    Millennium Hall

  • As a thought leader among his peers and in his senior role at Wexford Science & Technology, Tom Osha will deliver his insights on "Innovation Districts and Geographic Trends Driving Technology-Led Economic Development." Osha plans to examine how cities are establishing innovation districts to encourage research, discovery, entrepreneurial activity and corporate engagement, and how federal laboratories can play an important role as intellectual drivers of these environments.
    Plenary
    Where
    Commonwealth B-D

  • Three Philadelphia-based incubator and accelerator managers will share their initiatives to support entrepreneurial development and local ecosystems in the Philly area. Panelists will discuss how they build, nurture and accelerate companies, and enable their clients to commercialize new technologies.
    Session
    Where
    Commonwealth Hall

  • The Institute for Advanced Composite Manufacturing Innovation (IACMI) is one of 14 National Network of Manufacturing Institutes. This DOE-sponsored institute focuses on accelerating the commercialization of carbon fiber composites. The panel will feature an IACMI project team that has collaborated to optimize resins and sizings for vinyl ester/carbon fiber composites. Representatives of the team from industry, academia, federal labs, and IACMI will share their perspectives on this approach to collaboration.
    Session
    Where
    Commonwealth Hall

  • The Water Council (TWC) of Milwaukee, WI, is the "industry bridge organization" for the FLC's Water Technology Focus Area (TFA), and thus the bridge between federal laboratories and water-related industries. This session will feature a panel moderated by Karen Frost of TWC, and include industry, academia, and economic development participants. They will address the advancement of private R&D in water technology, as well as trends, needs, and opportunities in the private sector that could inform the federal labs and present opportunities for improving technology transfer.
    Session
    Where
    Commonwealth B-D

  • The federal government invests approximately $150 billion annually in R&D, and approximately one-third of this is conducted directly at federal laboratories. Facing increased competition from around the globe and with China projected to surpass the U.S. in scientific investment, it is critical that the U.S. maximize the return from its federal R&D investment for the nation’s benefit. The ROI initiative is recognized by the White House as a key part of advancing the President’s Management Agenda to modernize government for the 21st century, specifically the associated Lab-to-Market Cross-Agency Priority (CAP) Goal. Dr. Walter G. Copan will discuss the ROI initiatives and how they relate to the Lab-to-Market CAP Goal set forth in the President’s Management Agenda.
    Session
    Where
    Commonwealth B-D

See You in Philly!

Join us at the birthplace of American innovation as we celebrate technology transfer success and create new strategizes for strengthening lab to market efforts for economic impact.